Program Details


Rates as of February 2017

Age of Child Day Rate Week Rate  
6 weeks to 18 months of age
140.00  
19 months to 2 years of age
135.00  
Older than 3 years of age
130.00  

We also continue to bill for holdiays:  New Years Day, Labor Day,
Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, Memorial Day, and 4th of July even though we will be closed on those said days.

Holding Fee:
You will need to put down a deposit (non-refundable) of $103 before your child will be added to the waiting list.  We normally only have openings in August of every year.  For example:  If you have one child to enroll and your second child is due in October but you won't need child care for the second child until January, you will have to pay the weekly rate starting on when we have an opening (August every year).
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Hours of Operation

 
Our hours of operation is 6:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday.

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Program  Schedule

6:30-8:15                       Greet Children                                 Free Play
8:15-9:00                       Breakfast                                        Toilet, wash hands, eat, clean up
9:00-9:45                       Free play and or outdoor play           Children choose activities
9:45-10:00                     Prepare for Preschool                      Straighten up, toilet, wash hands
10:00-10:15                   Group time                                      Stories, sharing activities, discuss plans for the day

10:15-11:00                   Preschool
11:00-11:15                   Prepare for Lunch
11:15-12:00                   Lunch
12:00-12:15                   Prepare for quiet time                       Toilet, wash hands, reading time, listen to soft music

12:15-2:15                     Quiet Time
2:15-2:30                       Wake up                                          Put up bedding, toilet, wash hands
2:30-3:00                       Free play
3:00-3:30                       Afternoon Snack
3:30-5:30                       Outdoor Play and/or Free play                      

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Goals


1.  To provide a safe environment that offers children the opportunity to further their development of large motor skills and promote healthy, physical growth through outdoor ad indoor play as well as fine motor development through manipulative toys, blocks, and puzzles.

2.  To provide a stimulating environment that promotes intellectual development in children.  To provide children the opportunity to grow in social skills through the positive interactions with other people.

3.  To provide an environment that helps children recognize their value as individuals.

4.  To provide the opportunity to grow through a wide variety of learning experiences.

5.  To encourage creativity by offering experiences in music, art, and literature.

6.  To provide age appropriate materials and equipment that supports children's learning.

7.  To partner with parents in the care and learning of their children.


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Our Philosophy
Early childhood research shows that young children learn primarily through play. Play is an essential part of childhood. It offers the freedom children need to try out new ideas, practice developing skills, and imitate adult roles. It allows children to learn social skills and develop friendships.
Children are knowledge builders. They apply what they have already learned to different situations. Exploring, discovering, questioning, and guessing are important activities. “Readiness” skills are developed through play, and concepts are formed. Children gain a sense of mastery through their activities. They become the active decision-makers in their own scenarios. Our center promotes the development of the whole child through play.
Activities in the classroom reflect our commitment to provide a developmentally appropriate experience for all children. The National Academy of Early Childhood Programs, our NAEYC accrediting association, is a strong advocate for developmentally appropriate practices and activities for young children.
We believe that children learn through active hands on involvement with materials, equipment, and activities. During active play, a child’s mind, body, and emotions develop, and true learning takes place. We encourage children to be independent in basic care routines because these routines can provide as much opportunity for meaningful learning to occur as experiences planned in the interest areas of the classroom. Our goal is to provide a stimulating, sensitive environment that supports the child’s social, emotional, physical, and cognitive growth.
Children learn how to form positive, caring, cooperative relationships by interacting with children and adults. Through these interactions, children learn to get along with others. When a child experiences success in play and is encouraged to make choices, communicate thoughts and feelings in a positive way, and accept responsibility for actions, the child learns social skills that will last a lifetime. Early childhood play experiences effect learning and personal growth throughout life. Our objective is to assist families in the task of providing a strong foundation for their child’s future development.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Curriculum 

The curriculum we use is called Creative Curriculum by Teaching Strategies. The Creative Curriculum is research-based on well known theories of child development. It also meets all of the criteria for a developmentally appropriate early childhood curriculum. We will also incorporate the educational quality standards of Indiana’s Foundations and the Read, Play, Learn (our weekly book). 
This curriculum is based on the premise that the best way to teach young children is by using an appropriate environment as well as a planned appropriate schedule and good teacher/child interactions. It is very important for our children to learn to process, search for and apply information to different situations. We prepare for both the immediate and long –term future of learning by supporting their individual learning styles appropriately.
Early childhood research shows that young children learn primarily through play. Play is an essential part of childhood. It offers the freedom children need to try out new ideas, practice developing skills, and imitate adult roles. It allows children to learn social skills and develop friendships.  Exploring, discovering, questioning, and guessing are important activities. “Readiness” skills are developed through play, and concepts are formed. Children gain a sense of mastery through their activities. They become the active decision-makers in their own scenarios. Our center promotes the development of the whole child through play.  To learn about The Creative Curriculum please visit:    
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Developmentally Appropriate Practice

The curriculum we use is called Creative Curriculum by Teaching Strategies. The Creative Curriculum is research-based on well known theories of child development. It also meets all of the criteria for a developmentally appropriate early childhood curriculum. We will also incorporate the educational quality standards of Indiana’s Foundations and the Read, Play, Learn (our weekly book also). 

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) defines developmentally appropriate practice as resulting from the process of professionals making decisions about the well-being and education of children based on core considerations in developmentally appropriate practices:


1. What is known about child development and learning—knowledge of age-related human characteristics that permit general predictions within an age range about what activities, materials, interactions, or experiences will be safe, healthy, interesting, achievable, and also challenging to children;

2. What is known about the strengths, interests, and needs of each individual child in the group, to be able to adapt for and be responsive to inevitable individual variation; and

3. Knowledge of the social and cultural contexts in which children live to ensure that learning experiences are meaningful, relevant, and respectful for the participating children and their families.


Note: From Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Programs (p.9). by C.Coppie and S. Bredekamp, 2009. Washington, D.C. Copyright 2009 by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).


Developmentally Appropriate Practice refers to an approach or guide to education/teaching. A program is generally thought of as “developmentally appropriate” if its practices are based on what is appropriate for the age and stage of development of the children they serve and if it meets the individual needs of the child and family. Developmentally appropriate practices looks at what is relevant to and respectful of the child, the child’s family, neighborhood, and community.


This means that we are able to focus on the child and family. We are a child-centered facility. Not only will children’s intellectual needs be met through carefully planned curriculum experiences but care will be given so that children’s–social, emotional, physical, and creative needs are met as well. Equipment, materials, and supplies are age and stage appropriate for the age groups we serve. Teachers and administrators are trained at looking at the needs and interests of the “whole child.” Teachers spend a great deal of time watching, listening and speaking with children. Teachers use their observational skills to help prepare the classroom environment to support the young three-year-old child and to challenge the older five-year-old child. Our classroom environment supports children at different developmental levels so they can participate in activities with equal success.

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  Play

Play is the core or the “hub” of all early childhood activity. Children need to play with real objects rather than worksheets to form conceptual understandings about things in their world. Children need to move as they learn. Carefully prepared learning centers in the classroom help children interact actively with equipment, materials and supplies. Meaningful learning occurs when children are engaged in activities that support their growth and development in appropriate ways. Play has been referred to as a “window” to the child’s world. Specially trained staff peek into this window to facilitate the child’s whole development. Teachers engage children in meaningful dialogue that supports the acquisition of learning skills in the developmental areas of physical, social-emotional, language, and in the curriculum contents areas of cognitive development; early literacy, early mathematics, science, technology, creative expression and appreciation for the arts, health and safety, and social studies.

           

 

 

 

 

 


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